Living Legend: Patricia Smith Prather

Ms. Prather became the consultant to the Houston Public Library’s African American Library at the Gregory School in February 2009. Her duties included assisting with collection and archive development, along with donation obtainment. She collected photographs and artifacts for the Gregory School’s exhibits, as well as papers, letters, and other documents for the archives. She

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Our Mother of Mercy Parish Celebrated 25 Years of Service

Source/Photo credit: Provost Studios The Our Mother of Mercy Parish (Rev. Rodney Armstrong, S.S.J., Pastor) celebrated 25 years of service as they honored Deacon Charles J. Allen, Sr. and Deacon Cornelius Llorens; on their ordination as Deacons in the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston. Twenty-five years ago The Most Reverend Joseph A. Fiorenza ordained Deacons Allen and

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Broken…

By TJ Baker HOUSTON – There has been much debate going on about the Reparation bill, H.R. 40. Some wonder, whether it should be passed or not; if Black folks should receive any kind of compensation like the Japanese and Jewish people did following World War II. The Japanese, because America held majority of the

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Bringing Home One Billion Dollars for Indigent and Uninsured Health Care

By Senator Borris Miles This session I brought more healthcare dollars to our community and ensured that the new University of Houston medical school serves the community where it will be located. The governor signed into law my legislation that would allow Harris County hospitals to draw down one billion dollars in federal Medicaid reimbursement

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Living Legend: Pluria Marshall, Sr.

Civil rights and media activist Pluria W. Marshall, Sr. was born on October 19, 1937 in Houston, Texas. After graduating from high school, Marshall enlisted in the U.S. Air Force. He served from 1956 to 1960 and was honorably discharged as an Airman, First Class. Marshall went on to attend Texas Southern University for two

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The Truth About Integration The Black Community – Part VIII.

By Roy Douglas Malonson “The legal battle against segregation is won, but the community battle goes on.” – Dorothy Day In this final piece dealing with the Truth About Integration, I want to address one of the most crucial elements within the Black culture that integration had the most impact on. The Black community as

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Forget the Presidency, Go For the Senate

By Earl Ofari Hutchinson Trump may win. Though Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer would never in a million years publicly say anything like that. The brutal reality is he might. Schumer not so quietly has done the next worst thing and said that the Democrats need to get some candidates in place who can make

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Injustice in the Justice System

By Rashad Richey We want very specific things from our criminal justice system: safe streets, low crime, the correct people in jail and low-level, nonviolent offenders out of jail. It seems a small request, but even before 14-year old Emmett Till was lynched for allegedly saying “bye, baby” to a White woman at a store

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The Truth About Integration Part VII. Work Ethics

By Roy Douglas Malonson “THE greatest indictment of such education as Negroes have received, however, is that they have thereby learned little as to making a living, the first essential in civilization.” – Carter G. Woodson, The Mis-Education of the Negroe As I reflect over Our journey in America; I can’t help but surmise that

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Shades of …

By Roy Douglas Malonson It is no secret that America has always had two shades of color – Black and White. American history in times past classified any individual of any race, who was not Black, as White. Freedom as it relates to the American culture is no different. U.S. History clearly reflects this. For

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