National News

By Shelley McKinley Donna Blackshear-Reynolds is a federal treasure, currently serving as the Associate CFO for Organizational Development within the Office of the Chief Financial O cer at NASA, Johnson Space  Center (JSC), an organization of approximately 180 civil servants. Donna also serves as the senior JSC Ombudsman, appointed by the JSC Center Director...

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Entertainment

[Photo: Beyonce] Destiny’s Child, one of the most iconic girl groups of the late 1990s and early 2000s, has left an indelible mark on the music industry with hits like “Say My Name,” “Survivor,” and “Bootylicious.” The group, originally formed in Houston, Texas, underwent several lineup changes before settling on the most famous trio...

Local News

Corporal Robert Curley Malonson is currently a Detective assigned to the Criminal Investigations Unit for the Harris County Pct 1 Constables Office. Curley rejoined the Pct 1 Constable’s Office Family in 2021, a er retiring from the US Department of Justice Federal Bureau of Prisons with over thirty years of public service.Curley is a...

Politics

[Photo: Flickr] Justice Clarence Thomas, a long-serving member of the U.S. Supreme Court, finds himself at the center of ethical controversies that have stirred significant debate about the integrity of the judiciary and the standards to which justices should be held. The concerns primarily revolve around the actions of his wife, Virginia “Ginni” Thomas,...

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By Jazz Paz It is no coincidence that the month of new year’s resolutions is the month of mental health awareness, especially for Black and brown people. Sixty-seven percent of Texans declared themselves to be African American or brown in the 2020 national census. In these communities self-care is often seen as self-indulgence rather than urgently necessary. When expressions of emotional distress are taboo, they become difficult to recognize and admit to. Too many individuals experience a mental health diagnosis as a label that implies a weakness. Being a “strong person” encourages victory in athletics and other physical successes, but not in activities that promote emotional or mental growth, especially for men.   According to the National Institute of Health, Black and brown people are twice as prone to depression. anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder than whites, and that racism, discrimination, and poverty all contribute to psychological disorders.  These burdens foster the temptation to unwisely hide our mental struggles to defend against further bigotry, especially since the media (like, Silence of  the Lambs or  the Joker),  flaunt mental impairment through characters that are dangerous, crazy, murderers.   An exacerbating contributor to mental stress is that helpful resources can be difficult to obtain when people lack health insurance, work irregular schedules, or are without reliable transportation, but relief exists for those who su er.  The Hope Line (832-831-7337) at the Hope and Healing Center offers free 30-minute peer counseling over the phone as well as free support for adults (https://hopeandhealingcenter.org/).  e Harris Center for Mental Health (24/7 crisis line 713- 970-7000; toll-free 866-970-4770) serves those with or without legal status, in English and in Spanish, and can provide transportation (https:// www.theharriscenter. org/). If you need immediate suicide or mental health support or are worried about someone else, call or text 988.   If you are called upon to assist a friend or family member besieged by distress, recommend that they get or continue seeing a professional advocate as well as: • Listen to them. Empathize. Avoid judgment, just be a safe understanding hearer Remind the person of their inherent worth and...

Shocking Incident at Lakewood Church: What Black Communities Need to Know Now In a harrowing turn of events that has sent ripples through communities nationwide, Lakewood Church became the scene of an unthinkable act this past Sunday. A chilling shooting during a Spanish-language service, carried out by 36-year-old Genesse Ivonne Moreno, has left the city of Houston and its diverse communities in a state of turmoil and grief. A Young Life Hangs in the Balance Among the chaos, a 7-year-old boy fights for his life in a critical condition, symbolizing the innocence lost and the urgent need for action. A 57-year-old man, also caught in the line of fire, was able to leave the hospital, but the scars of the event remain. Houston Leaders Vow Change In the aftermath, Houston’s top officials, Mayor John Whitmire and Police Chief Troy Finner, are stepping up, promising to fortify the security of places of worship. Their pledge is more than a response; it’s a call to action for communities, especially Black communities, historically subjected to violence in sacred spaces. A Complex Motive Unfolds Moreno’s shocking spree, unleashing up to 12 shots inside the church, was not just an act of violence but a message intertwined with pro-Palestinian sentiments found on her firearm. This twist adds a layer of complexity to her motives, sparking widespread speculation and concern over the implications for security and community relations. The Bigger Picture: Safety, Mental Health, and Community Resilience This incident isn’t just a news story; it’s a wake-up call for communities of color across America. It’s a reminder of the ongoing struggles with gun violence, mental health, and the safety of our sacred spaces. As Black communities, who’ve faced both historical and present-day challenges of violence, this event pushes us to the forefront of the conversation on how to protect our places of worship and ensure the well-being of our congregants. Law Enforcement’s Swift Response With a raid on a Conroe residence linked to Moreno, law enforcement is leaving no stone unturned. This comprehensive approach not only seeks justice but underscores the need for vigilance and preparedness...

Written by Stacy M. Brown   His illustrious career included ABA titles with the Pacers in 1972 and 1973, with McGinnis earning playoff MVP honors during the latter championship run. NBA Hall of Famer George McGinnis has died at 73. According to the Indiana Pacers organization, the legendary player, who won two ABA championships with the team and later made a name for himself in the NBA, died Thursday morning. McGinnis had been hospitalized following a cardiac arrest at his residence last week. The Simon family and Pacers Sports & Entertainment expressed their condolences while highlighting McGinnis’s profound impact on the basketball community. “George McGinnis shaped so many of the fondest basketball memories for generations of Hoosiers. He was the very definition of an Indiana basketball legend, a champion, and Hall of Fame athlete. But he was more than that. George was family,” the statement read. Recognized for his exceptional contributions to the Pacers, McGinnis played a pivotal role during his two stints in the ABA and NBA Finals. His illustrious career included ABA titles with the Pacers in 1972 and 1973, with McGinnis earning playoff MVP honors during the latter championship run. The basketball maestro was also honored as the ABA co-MVP in the 1974–75 season with the legendary Julius Erving after achieving a career-high average of 29.8 points per game. McGinnis transitioned to the NBA in 1975, joining the Philadelphia 76ers, where he earned consecutive All-Star nods before departing in 1978. Before retiring with the Pacers in 1982, he had a brief stint with the Denver Nuggets (1978–80) and received another All-Star selection. The basketball world formally recognized his monumental impact on the sport with his induction into the Naismith Hall of Fame in 2017, and the Pacers honored him by retiring his jersey number, No. 30. Before turning pro, McGinnis was a third-team All-American at Indiana University in 1970–71, leading the Big Ten in scoring and rebounding.

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Lester and Allene Rogers welcomed their baby girl, Sharla Lyn’Nell Rogers, on September 15, 1972. She was reared in the Acres Homes community and educated in the Aldine Independent School District where she was a 1990 graduate of Eisenhower High School. She would go on to earn a degree in music education from Houston Baptist University now Houston Christian University in 1995 and a master’s in education administration from Sam Houston State University in 2008. Throughout middle school, high school, and college, Sharla excelled in choral music. This is evidence of her being awarded various medals in competition at the district, region, and state levels. During college she sang at various churches throughout the Houston area to include Garden Villas Baptist church and Grace Presbyterian. She also appeared in numerous musical and opera productions. Sharla’s musical interest was extensive.

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[Photo: Beyonce] Destiny’s Child, one of the most iconic girl groups of the late 1990s and early 2000s, has left an indelible mark on the music industry with hits like “Say My Name,” “Survivor,” and “Bootylicious.” The group, originally formed in Houston, Texas, underwent several lineup changes before settling on the most famous trio of Beyoncé Knowles, Kelly Rowland, and Michelle Williams. Though the group officially disbanded in 2006, each member has pursued successful solo careers and personal endeavors. Here’s a look at where the original members of Destiny’s Child are now.   Beyoncé Knowles-Carter, often simply known as Beyoncé, has arguably become the most successful alumna of Destiny’s Child. She has built an illustrious solo career, earning the title of one of the best-selling music artists of all time. With numerous awards under her belt, including multiple Grammys, Beyoncé has continually reinvented her music and artistry, touching on genres ranging from R&B and pop to hip hop and even country. Her visual album “Lemonade” was a cultural phenomenon, praised for its exploration of race, feminism, and infidelity. Beyond music, Beyoncé has also made her mark in acting, fashion, and philanthropy. She’s a co-founder of the activewear line Ivy Park and has been involved in various charitable efforts, including support for Black Lives Matter and COVID-19 relief efforts. Beyoncé is married to rapper Jay-Z, and together they have three children.   Kelly Rowland has also enjoyed a successful solo career, with hits like “Dilemma” (a collaboration with Nelly) and “Motivation.” Her music spans R&B, pop, and dance, showcasing her versatility as an artist. Rowland has also ventured into acting, appearing in television and film projects. She has served as a judge on popular music competition shows such as “The X Factor” in the UK and USA. In addition to her entertainment career, Kelly has been active in philanthropy, working with organizations that support women and children. She published a book on motherhood and has launched a makeup line tailored for Black women. Kelly is married and has two children.   Michelle Williams has taken a somewhat different path, focusing much...

[Photo: dallasartsdistrict.org] Dallas, TX – Dallas Black Dance Theatre (DBDT) and Broadway Dallas (BD) are continuing their annual arts education accessibility partnership with the Dallas Independent School District (DISD) for a fourth year. Originally started to bridge the gap in arts access during the pandemic, the partnership has grown into a yearly district-wide program each February that to date has served over 59,000 students. Between February 5-16, 2024, Dallas Black Dance Theatre will present their Cultural Awareness virtual matinee to every student and grade level in the Dallas Independent School District during Black History Month 2024, which includes performances of the works in•ter•pret choreographed by Hope Boykin, For Etta, choreographed by Carmen Cage, a tap lecture and demonstration led by Sean J. Smith and Like Water, choreographed by Darrell Grand Moultrie. The virtual matinee is made possible at no charge by Broadway Dallas in partnership with Dallas Black Dance Theatre and Dallas Independent School District. “This program advances the importance of cultural literacy for every student in Dallas ISD. We are fortunate to have partners like Dallas Black Dance Theatre and Broadway Dallas who are committed to making this happen and to invest in the education and lives of our students,” said Dr. Scott Rudes, Executive Director of Academic Enrichment and Support for Dallas Independent School District. Designed to increase cultural literacy by providing access to all Dallas ISD students across grade levels and disciplines, this arts education initiative is in keeping with the mission of the National Endowment for the Arts, to support arts learning, affirm and celebrate America’s rich and diverse cultural heritage, and extend its work to promote equal access to the arts in every community across America. Hope Boykin is a dancer and choreographer who created in•ter•pret for Dallas Black Dance Theatre in 2005 with funds by the Arts District Foundation. The work was reinterpreted in 2015 and was described by The Dallas Morning News as “one of the best pieces in the Dallas Black Dance Theatre repertory.” Boykin describes the piece as lighthearted, quick and whimsical with expansive full movement. A former dancer with the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater for over 20 years, Boykin now serves as Artistic Advisor for Dance Education at the Kennedy Center and Artistic Lead for the Kennedy Center Dance Lab. Carmen Cage is a current Dallas...

Opinion

[Photo: David Kidd] Readers of a certain age may remember when being recognized as being a Texan was something to be proud of. We were known then to be friendly, honest, and welcoming. Independent, industrious workers. Highly skeptical of our government. We loved our neighbors, our neighborhood schools, our church, trail rides, and eating...

Education

CONROE (February 26, 2024) – Lone Star College-Montgomery’s Office of Culture and Engagement, Black History Month Team, and Student Success Institute joined together to celebrate Black History Month with a focus on collective culture enrichment and the arts. Black History Month, observed annually in February, stands as a commemoration to honor the remarkable achievements, experiences,...

Business

Written by Stacy M. Brown The 53-year-old star, celebrated for her roles in “Empire” and “The Color Purple,” opened up about the substantial pay gap that Black women face in the entertainment industry. In a recent SiriusXM interview with Gayle King, iconic actress Taraji P. Henson bravely addressed the pervasive issue of pay inequality...

October 16, 2023, HOUSTON, TX – Congressional Candidate Amanda Edwards has raised over $1 million in less than 4 months, a substantial sum that helps bolster the frontrunner status of the former At-Large Houston City Council Member in her bid for U.S. Congress. Edwards raised over $433,000 in Q3 of 2023. This strong Q3 report expands on a successful Q2 where Edwards announced just 11 days after declaring her candidacy that she had raised over $600,000. With over $829,000 in cash-on-hand at the end of the September 30th financial reporting period, Edwards proves again that she is the clear frontrunner in the race. “I am beyond grateful for the strong outpouring of support that will help me to win this race and serve the incredible people of the 18th Congressional District,” said Edwards. “We are at a critical juncture in our nation’s trajectory, and we need to send servant leaders to Congress who can deliver the results the community deserves. The strong support from our supporters will help us to cultivate an 18th Congressional District where everyone in it can thrive.” Edwards said. “Amanda understands the challenges that the hard-working folks of the 18th Congressional District face because she has never lost sight of who she is or where she comes from; she was born and raised right here in the 18th Congressional District of Houston,” said Kathryn McNiel, spokesperson for Edwards’ campaign. Edwards has been endorsed by Higher Heights PAC, Collective PAC, Krimson PAC, and the Brady PAC. She has also been supported by Beto O’Rourke, among many others. About Amanda: Amanda is a native Houstonian, attorney and former At-Large Houston City Council Member. Amanda is a graduate of Eisenhower High School in Aldine ISD. Edwards earned a B.A. from Emory University and a J.D. from Harvard Law School. Edwards practiced law at Vinson & Elkins LLP and Bracewell LLP before entering public service. Edwards is a life-long member of St. Monica Catholic Church in Acres Homes. For more information, please visit www.edwardsforhouston.com

As September 13th rolls around, we extend our warmest birthday wishes to the creative powerhouse, Tyler Perry, a man whose indomitable spirit and groundbreaking work have left an indelible mark on the world of entertainment. With his multifaceted talents as an actor, playwright, screenwriter, producer, and director, Tyler Perry has not only entertained but also inspired audiences worldwide, particularly within the African-American community, where his influence and role have been nothing short of powerful. Born in New Orleans, Louisiana, in 1969, Tyler Perry’s journey to stardom was a path riddled with adversity. Raised in a turbulent household, he found refuge in writing, using it as a therapeutic outlet. This period of introspection gave rise to one of his most iconic creations, Madea, a vivacious, no-nonsense grandmother who would later become a beloved figure in Perry’s works, offering a unique blend of humor and profound life lessons. Despite facing numerous challenges, including rejection and financial struggles, Perry’s determination and unwavering belief in his abilities propelled him forward. In 1992, he staged his first play, “I Know I’ve Been Changed,” which, although met with limited success, was a pivotal moment in his career. Unfazed by initial setbacks, Perry continued to hone his craft, and by 1998, he had successfully produced a string of stage plays that showcased his storytelling prowess.

Calling all teenage student-athletes! If you have dreams of playing college soccer and wish to represent an HBCU, the HBCU ID Camp is your golden opportunity. From 8 am to 5 pm on November 11-12, Houston Sports Park will transform into a hub for aspiring male and female soccer players. Coaches from HBCUs across the nation will be present to evaluate, scout, and offer valuable feedback. Moreover, they might even spot the next soccer prodigy to join their collegiate soccer programs. This camp is not just about honing your soccer skills but also a chance to connect with the HBCU soccer community. You’ll learn the ins and outs of what it takes to excel on the field and in the classroom, which is crucial for a college athlete. The HBCU ID Camp is an excellent platform to network with coaches, learn from experienced athletes, and take the first steps toward your college soccer journey. To secure your spot at this incredible event, don’t forget to register [here](insert registration link). Space is limited to 120 participants, so make sure to reserve your place before it’s too late. It’s time to turn your dreams of playing college soccer into a reality.

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