National News

By: Shelley McKinley, Ed.D. Brian Jack, CEO and Owner of Brian Jack Produc-tions, LLC was born and raised in Dayton, Texas. Music seems to be his birthright since he watched and studied other family members as they per-formed in their zydeco and gospel bands and later picked up the accordion without any formal training....

FOLLOW US

NEED PAST ISSUES?

Search our archive of past issues Receive our Latest Updates
* indicates required

Entertainment

In a heartwarming turn of events, Cherelle and Brittney Griner have announced that they are expecting their first child together. This joyful news comes after a particularly challenging period for the couple, marked by Brittney’s detention in Russia, which drew international attention and concern.   Brittney Griner, a star center for the Phoenix Mercury...

Local News

By: Gretchen Andsager Americans now owe over $1 Trillion in credit card debt, it may come as no surprise that younger generations are finding themselves targeted by opportunistic scammers. A new report by BadCredit.org revealed 78% of millennials and Gen Z report being targets of debt collection scams. When it comes to the states...

Politics

Authoritarian regimes generally abolish or restrict civil liberties, concentrate political power, and impede and weaken free elections that allow for alternations of power. Authoritarian states might nominally contain democratic institutions such as political parties, legislatures, and elections, which are managed in such a way as to entrench authoritarian rule, for example gerrymandering and a...

FOLLOW US

NEED PAST ISSUES?

Search our archive of past issues Receive our Latest Updates
* indicates required

Trending

HEALTH DISPARITIES AMONG AFRICAN-AMERICANS

By: PfizerNews While the spotlight right now may be on the disadvantages African Americans face while fighting the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), they are also disadvantaged throughout the health care system when combating other diseases. Compared to their white counterparts, African Americans are generally at higher risk for heart diseases, stroke, cancer, asthma, influenza and pneumonia, diabetes, and HIV/AIDS, according to the Office of Minority Health, part of the Department for Health and Human Services. One possible contributing factor: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says African Americans are more likely to die at early ages for all causes, as young African Americans are living with diseases that are typically more common at older ages for other races. For example: High blood pressure is common in 12% vs. 10%of blacks vs. whites aged 18-34 years, respectively. It is common in 33% vs. 22% of those aged 35-49 years, respectively. Diabetes is common in 10% of blacks aged 35-49 compared to 6%of whites. Stroke is present in 0.7% of blacks aged 18-34 compared to 0.4%of whites the same age. Stroke is common in 2% of African Americans compared to 1% of whites aged 35-49 and 7% vs. 4%, respectively, in those aged 50-64. e CDC said that social factors compared to others in the U.S., specifically whites, affect African Americans at younger ages: unemployment, living in poverty, not owning a home, cost-prohibitive effects of trying to see an MD, smoking, inactive lifestyle, or obesity. A white paper from Cigna went further, acknowledging mental health disparities between African Americans and white patients. They noted blacks are 20% more likely to report psychological distress and 50% less likely to receive counseling or mental health treatment due to the aforementioned underlying socioeconomic factors. Another area of health care there is a disparity is among renal disease. Blacks and African Americans can suffer from kidney failure at as much as 3 times the rate of Caucasians, according to the National Kidney Foundation.4 Black patients represent as much of a third of all patients in the U.S. receiving dialysis for kidney failure, though they don’t...

By: Cianna Morales Relocated and rebuilt, the Cornland School — a one-room schoolhouse that served Black children in Chesapeake before de-segregation — is continuing its mission to educate the community. Th e school, built in 1902, was slowly falling down at its original location on Benefit Road. Water was rising and plants and wildlife were encroaching on the old building when community members and city officials started raising money to save it 14 years ago. In 2021, the school was moved 6.2 miles to Glencoe Street, and a ribbon cutting last week welcomed alumnae and local residents to the newly restored building, now a museum. “I can’t describe it,” said Mildred Brown, an alumna, at the event. “The last time I saw it, it was in crumbles.” Brown, a lifelong Chesapeake resident, attended the school when she was 6 years old. She will turn 94 next month. She and three other women, all in their 80s and 90s, toured the restored building then circled a Maypole — a tradition that has traveled from one continent to another, and has deep roots in African American history. Emma Nixon, 88, and Pauline Sykes Smith, 89, walked with colorful ribbons wrapped around their hands. They both attended Cornland. Wanza Snead completed the group. Her husband went to the school too. The building was located on the Sneads’ property, and it was Snead who approached Chesapeake council-member Ella P. Ward in 2010 about preserving it. The group of women represent the last surviving classes of the school. It closed its doors around 1953, according to the Cornland School Foundation, a group dedicated to its preservation. Brown v. Board of Education, the supreme court ruling to desegregate schools, was decided in 1954. Before that, Cornland had been operating since Reconstruction. Some historical records indicate it started in 1885. It was founded by formerly enslaved people, and is one of the region’s earliest Reconstruction-era efforts at formalized education for African American students. In 1902, an old school building was sold for $18. Another structure — the current Cornland School — was built for $314.50. Raising money...

By: Keir Simmons and Corky Siemaszko DeHart Hubbard was the first black athlete to win an Olympic gold medal in an individual event. Hubbard studied at the University of Michigan starting in 1921, and the following year he won the first of six straight AAU long jump titles. He also won the AAU triple jump in 1922 and 1923 and at the NCAA he won the 100-yard dash in 1925 and the long jump in 1923. In 1925 he set a world record of 25-10⅞ (7.89) when he took the NCAA title for a second time, and then in 1926 he confirmed his ability as a sprinter when he equalled the world re-cord of 9.6 for 100-yard dash. Although injured, DeHart Hubbard won the 1924 Olympic long jump comfortably; he was again injured in 1928 when he finished 11th. Between these two appearances he had the best mark of his career in 1927 when he jumped 26-2¼ (7.98), but the mark was not recognized as a world record, because the take-off board was one inch higher than the landing pit. In all, Hub-bard bettered 25 feet on eleven occasions and was undoubtedly the greatest jumper of the pre-Owens era. A century ago, at a small stadium just outside Paris, a college track and field star from Ohio named William DeHart Hubbard took a dramatic leap forward for him-self and for all African Americans back home in the segregated United States of America. By defeating the best long jumpers in the world at the 1924 Paris Olympics, Hubbard became the first Black athlete to win an individual gold medal at the Games. Hubbard’s nephew Kenneth Blackwell, the former secretary of state of Ohio, told NBC News his uncle recognized that he was carrying the hopes and dreams of millions of Black Americans on his muscular frame when he raced down a track toward a sand pit and leaped into history. “He wrote his mother a letter that I now have framed, and the letter simply said that he was going across the ocean to become the first Negro to win an...

By: John Shea Willie Mays, the iconic and endearing “Say Hey Kid” who charmed countless fans with his brilliant athleticism and graceful style and was widely considered baseball’s greatest and most entertaining player, died Tuesday of heart failure. He was 93. “My father has passed away peacefully and among loved ones,” said Mays’ son, Michael Mays. “I want to thank you all from the bottom of my broken heart for the unwavering love you have shown him over the years. You have been his life’s blood.” The legendary slugger and center fielder was synonymous with the game of baseball, the Giants and San Francisco, where his 9-foot-tall bronze statue has greeted fans for more than two decades in front of Oracle Park at 24 Willie Mays Plaza. Mays was looking forward to Major League Baseball’s tribute to the Negro Leagues on Thursday day at Rickwood Field in Birmingham, Ala., where he starred as a teenager with the Birmingham Black Barons. “Today we have lost a true legend,” Giants chairman Greg Johnson said. “In the pantheon of baseball greats, Willie Mays’ combination of tremendous talent, keen intellect, showmanship, and bound-less joy set him apart. A 24-time All-Star, the Say Hey Kid is the ultimate Forever Giant. He had a profound influence not only on the game of baseball, but on the fabric of America. He was an inspiration and a hero who will be forever remembered and deeply missed.” Giants CEO Larry Baer added, “I fell in love with baseball because of Willie, plain and simple. My childhood was defined by going to Candlestick with my Dad, watching Willie patrol center field with grace and the ultimate athleticism. Over the past 30 years, working with Willie, and seeing firsthand his zest for life and unbridled passion for giving to young players and kids, has been one of the joys of my life.” Mays spent most of his 23-year playing career with the Giants, six in New York and 15 in San Francisco, making him a cherished superstar from coast to coast. He hit 660 home runs, made 24 All-Star appearances and...

In a heartwarming turn of events, Cherelle and Brittney Griner have announced that they are expecting their first child together. This joyful news comes after a particularly challenging period for the couple, marked by Brittney’s detention in Russia, which drew international attention and concern.   Brittney Griner, a star center for the Phoenix Mercury in the WNBA, was detained in Russia in 2022 on charges of possessing vape cartridges containing hashish oil, a banned substance in the country. Her detention, which lasted nearly 10 months, sparked widespread outcry and efforts from various diplomatic and public figures to secure her release. The ordeal was a significant strain on both Brittney and her wife, Cherelle, who tirelessly campaigned for her release while dealing with the uncertainty and fear surrounding the situation.   The couple’s reunion in December 2022 was a poignant moment, captured in a heartfelt embrace at the airport. Since then, they have been focusing on rebuilding their lives and enjoying their time together. The news of their expected addition to the family has been a beacon of hope and happiness for them, marking a new chapter filled with anticipation and joy.   Cherelle and Brittney shared their exciting news on social media, posting a photo that featured Cherelle with a noticeable baby bump. The couple expressed their gratitude for the support they have received over the past year and shared their excitement about welcoming their new baby. This announcement has been met with an outpouring of love and congratulations from fans, friends, and fellow athletes.   In their joint statement, Cherelle and Brittney emphasized the strength and resilience they have built as a couple through their recent trials. They expressed their eagerness to embrace parenthood and the new adventures it will bring. The couple is looking forward to the arrival of their baby this month, a milestone that symbolizes a fresh start and a hopeful future.   Brittney has resumed her professional basketball career with renewed vigor, but she has also been vocal about the importance of mental health and the need for support systems. Her experience has underscored the...

HOUSTON – Music transcends language and brings us together. In a time of division, we believe it can be a powerful force for harmony. That’s why we’re thrilled to present Houston’s inaugural Sounds of Harmony Music Concert – an elegant evening celebrating unity through the beauty of music. Join us for an unforgettable performance featuring talented young musicians from Houston and nationwide. You’ll be treated to a delightful mix of classical pieces, including original compositions by the artists. This is more than just a concert. We aim for this event to become an annual Houston tradition and even embark on a national tour in 2024! Your support makes it possible. Ticket proceeds and sponsorships help cover travel, lodging, venue rental, and production costs. We extend a heartfelt thank you to our sponsors and patrons for making this event a reality. Purchase Tickets – https://www.tix.com/ticket-sales/tix/7535   Southwest Student Regional Minister Dr. Abdul Haleem Muhammad

...

Opinion

America’s constitutional democratic governance system is being rewritten and restructured in front of our eyes with the legal complicity of the not so Supreme Court, and some national media outlets. Consequently, we have no good news. Too many White males both Republicans and Democrats desire power by going through the backdoor. It’s about Kamala...

Education

By: Dwight Daniels In 2022, the City of Houston received a $750,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Labor for a solar jobs program to provide career opportunities for residents without college degrees and living in under-resourced and underserved neighbor-hoods. The city turned to HCC for help in putting training in place. Th e...

Latest Articles

Business

By: Mike LaFirenza The American dream of homeownership often begins with a starter home—a manageable property that allows young adults and families to establish roots, build equity, and lay the groundwork for fi nancial security. This initial step on the property ladder fuels the housing market and strengthens the economy by creating a generation...

October 16, 2023, HOUSTON, TX – Congressional Candidate Amanda Edwards has raised over $1 million in less than 4 months, a substantial sum that helps bolster the frontrunner status of the former At-Large Houston City Council Member in her bid for U.S. Congress. Edwards raised over $433,000 in Q3 of 2023. This strong Q3 report expands on a successful Q2 where Edwards announced just 11 days after declaring her candidacy that she had raised over $600,000. With over $829,000 in cash-on-hand at the end of the September 30th financial reporting period, Edwards proves again that she is the clear frontrunner in the race. “I am beyond grateful for the strong outpouring of support that will help me to win this race and serve the incredible people of the 18th Congressional District,” said Edwards. “We are at a critical juncture in our nation’s trajectory, and we need to send servant leaders to Congress who can deliver the results the community deserves. The strong support from our supporters will help us to cultivate an 18th Congressional District where everyone in it can thrive.” Edwards said. “Amanda understands the challenges that the hard-working folks of the 18th Congressional District face because she has never lost sight of who she is or where she comes from; she was born and raised right here in the 18th Congressional District of Houston,” said Kathryn McNiel, spokesperson for Edwards’ campaign. Edwards has been endorsed by Higher Heights PAC, Collective PAC, Krimson PAC, and the Brady PAC. She has also been supported by Beto O’Rourke, among many others. About Amanda: Amanda is a native Houstonian, attorney and former At-Large Houston City Council Member. Amanda is a graduate of Eisenhower High School in Aldine ISD. Edwards earned a B.A. from Emory University and a J.D. from Harvard Law School. Edwards practiced law at Vinson & Elkins LLP and Bracewell LLP before entering public service. Edwards is a life-long member of St. Monica Catholic Church in Acres Homes. For more information, please visit www.edwardsforhouston.com

As September 13th rolls around, we extend our warmest birthday wishes to the creative powerhouse, Tyler Perry, a man whose indomitable spirit and groundbreaking work have left an indelible mark on the world of entertainment. With his multifaceted talents as an actor, playwright, screenwriter, producer, and director, Tyler Perry has not only entertained but also inspired audiences worldwide, particularly within the African-American community, where his influence and role have been nothing short of powerful. Born in New Orleans, Louisiana, in 1969, Tyler Perry’s journey to stardom was a path riddled with adversity. Raised in a turbulent household, he found refuge in writing, using it as a therapeutic outlet. This period of introspection gave rise to one of his most iconic creations, Madea, a vivacious, no-nonsense grandmother who would later become a beloved figure in Perry’s works, offering a unique blend of humor and profound life lessons. Despite facing numerous challenges, including rejection and financial struggles, Perry’s determination and unwavering belief in his abilities propelled him forward. In 1992, he staged his first play, “I Know I’ve Been Changed,” which, although met with limited success, was a pivotal moment in his career. Unfazed by initial setbacks, Perry continued to hone his craft, and by 1998, he had successfully produced a string of stage plays that showcased his storytelling prowess.

Calling all teenage student-athletes! If you have dreams of playing college soccer and wish to represent an HBCU, the HBCU ID Camp is your golden opportunity. From 8 am to 5 pm on November 11-12, Houston Sports Park will transform into a hub for aspiring male and female soccer players. Coaches from HBCUs across the nation will be present to evaluate, scout, and offer valuable feedback. Moreover, they might even spot the next soccer prodigy to join their collegiate soccer programs. This camp is not just about honing your soccer skills but also a chance to connect with the HBCU soccer community. You’ll learn the ins and outs of what it takes to excel on the field and in the classroom, which is crucial for a college athlete. The HBCU ID Camp is an excellent platform to network with coaches, learn from experienced athletes, and take the first steps toward your college soccer journey. To secure your spot at this incredible event, don’t forget to register [here](insert registration link). Space is limited to 120 participants, so make sure to reserve your place before it’s too late. It’s time to turn your dreams of playing college soccer into a reality.

This will close in 0 seconds

Scroll to Top
Search