Roy D. Malonson

Mr. Roy Douglas Malonson is a vivid advocate for the Acres Homes community. Mr. Malonson was born into a family of 11 people. As a child he was diagnosed with polio. However, he did not allow illness to stop him from hard work and determination. So many times, he faced bullying from kids which were cruel by calling him names because of having to wear a brace. Some of the same kids worked for his company and became his employees. This encourages me to not allow circumstances and obstacles to stop me from pressing forward. Unfortunately, Mr. Malonson’s mother left the family at the age of 5 for unknown reasons. However, His father John Curley Malonson Sr. challenged him by saying, “Something is wrong with your leg, but there is nothing wrong with your mind. Richness is defined by the mindset in which you adhere to. Though in life we may have differences we can make an impact to do great things.

Despite many of life’s challenges Mr. Malonson managed to stay in school and graduate for George Washington Carver High School in 1968. He was an apprentice of woodwork and started Roy’s Woodworking Company, the forerunner of Malonson Construction Company. In 1974, Mr. Malonson lost both his father and a brother to suicide. This is a pain in life that no one should have to endure. Mr. Malonson took his earnings from woodworking and invested in land in the Acres Homes area where he made negotiations with Shirley Ann a Booker T Washington Graduate and eventually became his wife. In the 1980’s Mr. Malonson got involved in the Acres Homes community founding the local chamber. He has worked with HISD, Mr. Thaddeus Lott to establish Acres Homes Coalition of Charter Schools. He has also established a newspaper by the name of African American News and Issues which displays the news from an African American perspective. Some articles like Embracing Fatherhood Ain’t Nothing new For the Black Man, Who Do We Go To, Time for Mothers to Mothers” brings day to day issues to forefront. Mr. Malonson and his wife Shirley opened Shirley Ann’s Black Arts and Kollectibles Inc, including sculptures, ceramics, dolls and African masks.

Mr. Malonson has donated both time and financial support to many educational and community organizations. He also headed the Acres Homes War on Drugs, the first community War on Drugs in the nation. Mr. Malonson founded the Acres Home Coalition Administrative School. He also closed the deal for the Acres Multiservice Center, the Acres Homes police station. It is possible to have respect even if there are differences. There are those that make noise and others that work silently in the background. Sometimes you have to speak up for that that can’t speak for themselves. The more that you learn will open up the door to the future for others that you may never know their name. Yet the seed you plant today can cause a great harvest. Mr. Malonson had an impact on my Uncle Shannon Kinniebrew who at the time was a 5th grader that attended Highland Heights Elementary in the past. He was the voice that went before the school board which caused the board to keep the school open under the leadership of Mrs. Ward. Mr. Malonson allowed Shannon to speak at programs for the Acres Homes Chamber of Commerce. Now today he is a counselor in a school and helps students as he was once helped himself. Mr. Malonson taught my uncle about hard work and determination and now he is passing that on to me and my brothers.

In conclusion, it is a good thing to remember your roots so that you will appreciate the load lifted that you did not have to carry. Mr. Malonson is a legend in the Acres Homes or the 44 as some would call it. Through the many businesses and organizations, he has opened doors that would be slammed in our faces. He did not allow illness to stop him from hard work and determination. So, I would suggest that you don’t allow circumstances and obstacles to stop you from putting one foot in front of the other. Though in life we may have differences we can make an impact to look in the mirror and strive to be a better person than we were yesterday.