Is Lizzo the new face of confidence or a cry for ‘self-love’ and attention?

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By: Nycole Hutchens

 

 HOUSTON – In recent ‘breaking the internet’ news, Lizzo had ‘Black Twitter’ up in arms after a video went viral of the singer twerking in a risque outfit at a Lakers game.

The ‘Truth Hurts’ singer’s questionable choice of clothing described as a ‘thong dress’ raised many eyebrows and clutched pearls, begging the question, “does the public have ‘fat phobia’ and/or an issue with seeing plus-sized women in sexy attire?”

It’s safe to say that Lizzo, a now eight-time Grammy nominated artist, is not only able to entertain on stage, but off stage as well.

However, from the time Lizzo stole our hearts with her outstanding first-ever performance at this year’s BET Awards, her recent appearances have us questioning if she is representing Black women well.

It is arguable whether the mainstream (white) media has pushed and marketed Lizzo based on her talent alone, or has she perfected the art of being the stereotype they love to see – loud, black, uncouth, oversexualized and overweight.

The reaction on Black Twitter was fast and furious.

On one hand, you have many women (and men) who rooted for Lizzo for her twerking skills while flaunting a backside-revealing outfit at a family event.

“Lizzo showing up to the Lakers with her whole a** out is no different from Rihanna showing up with a see through shirt and no bra. Calm down.”-Blogzilla

“Skinny girls show a** all day, on every social media platform. Yet one big girl do it and y’all upset? Because just cause y’all skinny don’t mean y’all healthy and it’s all for clout anyway soLet Lizzo get her money. “-@loveonmo

“poor lizzo. y’all don’t let sis breathe”-@_benJvimns

Then, there was the backlash.

“There’s a certain lack of humility on her,” one Instagram user commented.”

“It ain’t fat shaming” to say “she’s too much.” Another comment, with more than 25,000 likes, said, “That’s what’s wrong with people nowadays. They think anything they do is acceptable.”

“Dunno how we got to the point where we can’t criticize Lizzo or her songs cos she’s fat.

Everything is fat shaming with you people. It’s exhausting. Her outfit was tacky and trashy. I’d probably say the same thing if a slimmer artiste wore it idc.”-Adunni Achebe

Many have justified Lizzo’s claims of ‘body positivity’ and ‘self-love’ as a front to justify the unnecessary behavior at the game and other outlandish antics she has put on in the past, though, none have been as controversial as the one at a basketball game.

Let’s be clear, no one is saying Lizzo doesn’t have the right to showcase her body in the manner she wants. But with every action comes a reaction, and one must stay consistent with that energy.

It wasn’t until earlier this year in an interview with Time magazine that the singer admitted she did not feel comfortable in her body or like the way she looked.

“I was experiencing a little bit of unhappiness. I was not happy with the way I felt to my body. I didn’t feel sexy, and I didn’t know when it was going to end. There were times when I would go onstage and be like, ‘Y’all, I’m not going to lie. I’m not feeling myself.’ Sometimes I’d break down and cry. Sometimes the audience would just cheer to make me feel better. I was getting sick a lot. I was like, What the f— is going on? I need to fall back in love with my body,” she said.

Following the backlash, Lizzo addressed her ‘haters’ in an Instagram video telling people that they can kiss her where the sun didn’t shine.

“And you know what? If you really, really don’t like my a**, you can kiss it. ‘Cause kissing it makes it go away, I promise.”

It makes you wonder if Lizzo is buying her own so-called ‘body positivity’ claim, or is this a desperate cry for help as she struggles to accept the very body she admitted she’s uncomfortable in.

However she feels, many can relate We could dive deep and talk about the adverse consequences of carrying extra weight on your body, especially for black woman. We tend to act as if heart attacks, high-blood pressure and diabetes don’t add extra stress, but I digress.

Lizzo lives in a free country that gives one freedom of choice. But don’t confuse a ‘free’ country with your actions being free from consequences and judgement.