Martin Luther King: Civil Rights/Voting Rights

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Participatory democracy (voting rights/civil rights) is the foundational principle of social democracy. However, Blacks were only given these rights after the fact that is in recent times. Unfortunately, The Supreme Court in a recent ruling diluted the Voting Rights Act of 1965. God sees us before we see ourselves.

On January 6, White Supremacists violently showed the world that Voting Rights in America belong only to Whites, because the only votes that count are White Privilege votes. In the 15th Century, Martin Luther- a Catholic Priest- nailed 95 thesis to the doors of the Catholic Church propelling the birth of the Protestant religion, the priesthood of all believers. In the 1960’s, Martin Luther King inscribed on the hearts of Americans from the “Letter in the Birmingham Jail the higher morality and spirituality of self-purification.” Injustice should never be promoted or tolerated in a democratic society, and those who are the victims of societal injustices should self-purify in order not to participate in their own self-victimization. This was the power of Dr. King’s non-violent message/approach to securing the Civil Rights of Blacks. Words without deeds are the epitome of immorality. Saying one thing and doing another is not self-purification, but self-denigration.

We cannot have peace in America until individuals universally learn to transcend the color line that is, rid themselves of the graveyard philosophy of “my way or the highway.” Question: what is the plan of some Whites, other than White Privilege? We know the spiritual-moral plan of God, but what is the socio-cultural plan of some Whites? Is it simply confusion, chaos, mayhem and death?

The spirituality of the Civil Rights Movement is laid bare in Dr. King’s “Letter from the Birmingham Jail.” In order to ensure just democratic voting processes, individuals must participate consistently in voting processes. Therefore, much has been said by politicians, journalists, and purported Civil Rights Leaders about voter participation by minority voters. However, voter participation includes more than electing political leaders in local communities. Voter registration directly affects the criminal justice system, as well as civic governance of a community. Dr. King was fully aware of these dimensions of the Civil Rights struggle.

Unfortunately, we are not becoming better people; but bitter people, because of political leadership mentality in American society. Dr. King asked this spiritual question: where do we go from here? America, let’s pray that it is not to hell in a handbasket. God does not need everybody; He only needs somebody who is willing to say “Yes Lord! Here am I, send me.” Dr. King went to the spiritual-mountain top and looked over on the other side of glory, and saw the coming of the glory of the Lord. He saw a shining city set on a hill, and said in the scriptural words of the Gospel Writer Peter: “Grow in grace, and in the knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. To him be glory both now and forever.” (2 Peter 3: 18). Today, America honors Dr. King’s labor in the Lord for justice and equality for all Americans. Selah.