Local

Living Legend: Marvalette Hunter

Marvalette Hunter is the chief of staff of the City of Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner's Office. Hunter has more than 20 years of experience in public policy, project management, real estate development and finance. She is an architect and city planner with extensive knowledge of federal, state and local programs regarding housing, economic development, transportation and public infrastructure.

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H-E-B gives $3 million for coronavirus community support

As the threat of coronavirus impacts our communities, H-E-B is sure of one thing: they will do their part to help Texans. H-E-B will make an initial $3 million commitment to support local organizations helping people most in need and working hard to combat the spread of coronavirus.

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Living Legend: Cheryl Creuzot

On March 4, Mayor Sylvester Turner and the Houston City Council voted to approve the nomination of Cheryl Creuzot to serve as a member of the Port Commission of the Port of Houston Authority. Creuzot, a highly-respected business and civic leader, will be the first African-American female port commissioner in the nearly 116-year history once she is sworn in.

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Black-owned Unity Bank of Houston partners with leading global bank

Unity National Bank of Houston NA (“Unity”), the only African American owned bank in Texas and one of only two African American owned banking institutions with a National Chartered Banking License, announced an on-going knowledge exchange partnership with Citi under the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Financial Agent Mentor Protégé Program.

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Living Legend: Judge Zinetta Burney

In 1941, in Houston, Texas, Zinetta was the second of four children born to John and Thelma Arceneaux. At the age of 17, she gave birth to her only child, Sharon Maria Burney. A few years later, she became a Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN) and completed her high school education by earning her G.E.D.

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Houston’s historic ballerina graces stage again, talks ‘black female body’ and dance

Before Misty Copeland became the first African American principal dancer at the American Ballet Theatre, Lauren Anderson burst through a glass ceiling, becoming the first African American principal ballerina at the Houston Ballet in 1990. And before Anderson, when blacks were still considered "colored," Raven Wilkinson forged the path in the 1950s as a dancer for the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo.

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