Texas Round-Up: What’s Happenin’ Around Texas?

COVER11Austin – Is Austin unwelcoming to African Americans?A study by the University of Texas at Austin indicates that Austin is the only U.S. city with a shrinking African-American population.The African-American population dipped by 5 percent from 2000 to 2010, even while Austin’s general population grew by roughly 20 percent. Eric Tang, a UT professor who co-authored the report, gave reasons for the decline. Tang said African-Americans are leaving Austin because of disparities in public schools, a distrust of the Austin Police Department and roadblocks to snagging jobs in the fields of technology and construction — and relocating in suburbs such as Pflugerville.

Beaumont – Beaumont waits to see if ousted BISD Superintendent Timothy Chargois will file a request to appeal his termination. By law he has 15 days to file the written request for a hearing with an independent officer, but it must be done within that period after receiving notice of his termination, according to state education law. The BISD board of manager fired Chargois for just cause last week after the cheating scandals, financial mismanagement and thefts rocked the district and hurt the image of the district with the community. TEA moved in and replaced the board and installed a new interim superintendent. District policy now requires the board to also provide Chargois a written explanation of the good cause charges against him so that he has the chance to review the evidence for his termination and point out any errors.

Dallas - A Dallas City Council member has received death threats. Carolyn Davis serves District 7, and she’s been trying to get rid of loitering. She asked police to crack down. Davis and others believe many of those standing on street corners are dealing drugs and committing other crimes. The councilwoman is undaunted by the threats and has community support. Davis and police say they aren’t backing down contending the community deserves better.

San Antonio - Ivy Taylor made history in San Antonio on Tuesday, becoming the first African-American woman to be mayor of the city. She was appointed to fulfill the remainder of Julian Castro’s term. Castro left the office to become the to join President Barack Obama’s Administration as Secretary of Housing and Urban Development. Taylor grew up in New York and attended Yale University.

Her background is in urban planning, and she worked for the city as an urban planner before running for council in 2009. She was elected to her District 2 seat in 2009, and re-elected in 2011 and 2013.

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